Chapter 7. Major Traffic Laws - Part 1

Florida Drug and Alcohol Test (TLSAE) Course: Chapter 7. Major Traffic Laws - Part one

This chapter covers the following topics

7.1. Graduated Licensing and Insurance Requirements
7.2. Point System - Suspension, Revocation and Cancellation
7.3. Zero Tolerance and Implied Consent Laws
7.4. Safety Equipment and Driver Responsibility


During this segment of the course, you will be reading about your driving privileges and certain responsibilities associated with driving a motor vehicle on public roads. You will learn the qualifications for obtaining a license and the conditions you'll need to follow in order to keep your driving privileges.

Did you know that as of 2008, there were 208,320,601 licensed drivers in the United States with more than 15,000,000 living here in Florida? Add tourists to that and it means that the roads in Florida are very crowded and the chances of being involved in a collision are high.

Do you know the answer to this question?

Drivers who get more tickets are involved in __________crashes.

The correct answer is "more."

Drivers who get more tickets also have more collisions.

Section 7.1. Graduated Licensing and Insurance Requirements

Graduated licensing introduces new drivers to the driving experience in a gradual manner. Novice (New) drivers are expected to demonstrate responsible driving techniques and behavior before advancing to the next step in the process.

STEP 1  : Obtaining Your Learner's Permit

The first step in the process is to obtain a learner's permit. To obtain a learner's permit, potential drivers must meet the following requirements:
  • Be at least 15 years of age.
  • Complete the Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education Course or a Department of Education Driver Education Course.
  • Pass vision, road signs and road rules tests.
  • Have parental consent if under 18 years of age.
  • Present two forms of identification.
  • Present proof of Social Security Number.
  • Present proof of residential address. (Two documents will be required.)
  • Be in compliance with school attendance.
STEP 2 : During the First Three Months

Upon qualifying for a Learner's Permit, the following restrictions apply:
  • Driving is only allowed during daylight hours.
  • The permit holder must always be accompanied by a licensed driver who is at least 21 years of age and occupies the front passenger seat.
STEP 3 : After the First Three Months
  • Driving is only allowed between the hours of 6:00 am and 10:00 pm.
  • The permit holder must always be accompanied by a licensed driver 21 years of age or older, occupying the front passenger seat.
STEP 4 : Obtaining an Operator's License

The following criteria must be met to obtain an operator's license:
  • All drivers under 18 years of age, must hold a learner's license for 12 months without any moving violation convictions.
  • A parent or legal guardian must certify that the driver has 50 hours driving experience; 10 of these hours must include night-time driving.
STEP 5 : Class E Driver's License

After getting a full operator's license, there are still rules. A licensed driver who is 16 years of age can only operate a motor vehicle between the hours of 6:00 am and 11:00 pm, unless accompanied by a licensed driver who is 21 years of age or older, or if they are driving to and from work.

          16 year olds can only drive between these hours:        

A licensed driver who is 17 years of age can only operate a motor vehicle between 5:00 am and 1:00 am, unless accompanied by a licensed driver who is 21 years of age or older, or if driving to or from work.


      17 year olds can only drive between these hours:           



THE FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY LAW

The Financial Responsibility Law requires owners and operators of motor vehicles to be financially responsible for damages and/or injuries they may cause to others when a motor vehicle collision occurs.

This law requires any person to have bodily injury liability insurance at the time of:
  • A citation for DUI which results in a revocation.
These cases require the following minimum insurance coverage:
  • $100,000 Bodily Injury Liability (BIL) (to one person).
  • $300,000 Bodily Injury Liability to two or more persons.
  • $50,000 Property Damage Liability (PDL).
If you do not have required insurance to comply with the Financial Responsibility Law, your driver license and/or license plates will be suspended for up to three years. You will have to pay a reinstatement fee and show the department certified proof of full liability insurance on Form FR-44 for three years from the original suspension date to get your driving privilege back.
  • A suspension for too many points against your driver license.
  • A crash where you are at fault and injuries have occurred.
  • A revocation for Habitual Traffic Offender.
  • A revocation for any serious offense where the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is required to revoke your license.
The cases listed above (excluding DUI) must have the following minimum insurance coverage:

  • $10,000 Bodily Injury Liability (BIL) (to one person).
  • $20,000 Bodily Injury Liability to two or more persons.
  • $10,000 Property Damage Liability (PDL), or
  • $30,000 Combined single limits.

If involved in any of the above violations (excluding DUI) and you do not have insurance to comply with the Financial Responsibility Law, your driver license and/or license plates will be suspended for up to three years. You will have to pay a reinstatement fee and show the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles certified proof of full liability insurance on Form SR-22 for three years to get your driving privilege back.

In addition, if the driver or the owner of a vehicle is at fault in a collision, the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles can require them to pay for the damages before their driving privilege is reinstated.

Under this law, to protect yourself and others, you should have liability insurance on any motor vehicle you own or drive, including motorcycles.

The No-Fault Law

The Florida No-Fault Law requires anyone who owns a motor vehicle with four or more wheels (excluding taxis and limousines) that has been in the state for at least 90 days or non-consecutive days during the past 365 days to purchase a policy delivered or issued for delivery in this state. The minimum coverage is:
  • $10,000 of Personal Injury Protection (PIP).
  • $10,000 of Property Damage Liability (PDL).
You cannot buy a license plate and registration for a car, or other four-wheel vehicle, without having coverage issued in this state. Once you have this insurance, any time you renew it, fail to renew it, cancel it, or the insurance company cancels it, the insurance company must notify the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles will then notify you for an explanation. If you fail to provide proof of insurance, your driver license and license plate(s) will be suspended for up to three years.

You must maintain insurance coverage during the entire time that the car is registered in your name.

If your driver license and license plate(s) are suspended for not having insurance under the No-Fault Law, you will have to pay $150 and show proof of insurance to get them back. For a second offense within three years, you will pay $250. For a third offense within three years, you will have to pay $500. Also, if your driver license and plate(s) have been under suspension for 30 days or more for a no-fault insurance violation, a police officer can seize your license plate immediately.

SUSPENSION, CANCELLATION AND REVOCATION

A DRIVER'S LICENSE ISN'T PERMANENT; A DRIVER CAN LOSE THEIR DRIVING PRIVILEGES IN SEVERAL WAYS

Every time a driver is convicted of a traffic violation or is involved in a collision, it's recorded on their driving record. Florida uses a point system to identify unsafe drivers, assigning point values for each traffic violation, such as reckless driving, speeding, failing to obey stop signs, or driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs (DUI).

Most of this file is available to the public. Law enforcement agencies, employers and insurance companies check driving records through these files. Even car rental agencies can gain access to a driving record before renting a car. If the driving record indicates that a driver has committed too many violations or has been involved in too many crashes, the state may take away their driving privilege. Remember, the driving privilege is exactly that - a privilege - and if it isn't treated right, it can be lost.

The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is responsible for keeping driving records on file, and it has the power to cancel, suspend or revoke a license. It is against the law to drive with a canceled, revoked or suspended license, and drivers who ignore that law can be fined, jailed, or both.

Driving is a Privilege - Don't Lose It



There are a number of infractions that can cause you to lose or restrict your driving privileges. The following are of particular interest to teen drivers:
  • If you receive a moving traffic conviction while you have a learner's license, the one year period you are required to hold your learner's license will be extended for one year from the date of the conviction or until you are 18 years old, whichever happens first.
  • If you receive six points on your driving record within a 12-month period, your driving privileges are automatically restricted to business purposes only for 12 months or until you are 18, whichever happens first. If you receive additional points during this restricted period, the restriction is extended 90 days for each additional point.
  • If you have a blood alcohol level of .02 or more (applies to those under age 21), an administrative suspension of six months will result.
  • If you are convicted for possession of tobacco products (applies to those under age 18).
  • If you are truant in your school attendance, your driving privilege is suspended until you provide proof you have attended school for 30 consecutive days.
The Florida Legislature enacted requirements (Section 322.091, F.S.) that students who attain the age of 14 and accumulate 15 unexcused absences in a period of 90 calendar days be ineligible to receive or maintain driving privileges.

Just because a person has a license doesn't mean they are a good driver. There is so much to learn! It takes practice, and a lot of patience, courtesy and common sense. A driver education course will help you learn to be a better driver and will often reduce the cost of your insurance.

What do the terms cancel, revoke and suspend mean?

CANCELLATION

To CANCEL your license means just that. When your driver's license is canceled, it is voided and terminated and you must surrender it. Your license is no longer valid. If your license was issued because of a mistake or fraud (giving false information or identification), it will be canceled. If you fail to complete a department ordered school, your license may also be canceled.

REVOCATION

Your license must be REVOKED if you are found guilty of, or department records show:

  • Driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs or other controlled substances.
  • A felony in which a motor vehicle is used.
  • Not stopping to give help when the vehicle you are driving is involved in a crash causing death or personal injury.
  • Lying about the ownership or operation of motor vehicles.
  • Three cases of reckless driving within one year. Forfeiting bail and not going to court to avoid being convicted of reckless driving counts the same as a conviction.
  • An immoral act in which a motor vehicle was used.
  • Three major offenses or 15 offenses for which you receive points within a 5-year period.
  • A felony for drug possession.
  • Vision worse than the standard minimum requirements.
  • Racing on the highway. A court may also order that your license be revoked for certain other traffic offenses.
Your license will be revoked for at least three years if you kill someone because of reckless driving.

SUSPENSION

When your driver's license is suspended, the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles temporarily takes away your driving privilege.

How can your license be suspended? One of the measurements the DMV uses to track your driving performance is the number of points you accumulate on your driving record. The DHSMV may suspend your driver's license if you accumulate:

12 points within 12 months - 30 day suspension
18 points within 18 months - 90 day suspension
24 points within 36 months - One year suspension

The driving privileges of a minor might also be delayed or restricted if they are convicted of vandalism, or of being habitually truant from school.

Your license can be SUSPENDED if you:

  • Make a fraudulent driver license application.
  • Allow your license to be used for a purpose that is against the law.
  • Are convicted in a traffic court and the court orders that your license be suspended.
  • Refuse to take a test to show if you are driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Misuse a restricted license.
  • Earn a certain number of points for traffic offenses on the point system.
  • Break a traffic law and fail to pay your fine or appear in court as directed.
  • Fail to pay child support.
  • Fail to carry insurance on your vehicle.
  • Fail to stop for a school bus.
  • Use tobacco if you are underage.
  • Commit retail theft.
  • School truancy.




Florida Drug and Alcohol Test (TLSAE) Course:



Florida TLSAE/Drug & Alcohol 4 hour Course Online

Who is required to take this 4-hour drug and alcohol course?


This is a first-time drivers ed course for new aspiring drivers. The state of Florida requires all new drivers take a 4-hour drug and alcohol course. If you want your Permit License you must take this course. You can take the DATA course when you are 14 1/2. You can sign up right now at our website. Our course is easy and fun!
  •     Florida 4 hour first-time drivers course also referred as:
  •     TLSAE - Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education
  •     DATA - Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness course
  •     DATE Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness Education course
  •     ADAPT - Alcohol Drugs Accident Prevention Training
  •     Drug & Alcohol Course or Drug and Alcohol Class
  •     Florida Permit Test or Florida Permit Exam Course
  •     The Permit Test is also known as the DMV Exam or DMV Test
Florida first time driver course required to get a Florida drivers license. Florida first time driver courses teach drivers how drugs and alcohol affect driving,. In that situation you have to go home, make a new appointment and return the DMV. Every new driver is required to take a Florida TLSAE course.

Enroll your Florida 4 hour drug and alcohol course online and meet your learner's permit requirement.

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