Pages

Florida Drug and Alcohol test course for Learners Permit / driver's license is approved by Florida DMV. Complete your A.D.A.P.T.-Alcohol Drugs Accident Prevention Training, TLSAE- traffic law and substance abuse education, D.A.T.A- Drug, Alcohol and Traffic Awareness Course, also known as the Florida first time drivers ed course online, go for DHSMV exam and pass it, and obtain your Florida Learner's Permit. Start learning how to drive safely.

Stress, emotions, and fatigue

Introduction

When you think of impairment, the term is usually associated with the effects of drinking or consuming other drugs.

Stress, your emotions, and being tired also have similar effects on your ability to drive safely. Stress and aggression are often displayed by the way people drive.

Being tired also has very similar effects on the body as alcohol consumption.

This module will explore the ways to recognize and manage stress, emotional impairment, and fatigue-impaired driving.

Learning Objectives

This module addresses stress, emotions, and fatigue. The topics that will be covered include:
  1. Stress
  2. Why Driving Makes People Angry
  3. Aggressive Driving
  4. Managing Your Emotions
  5. Fatigue
1. Stress

While many people use alcohol to relieve stress, there are a number of positive ways to deal with stress. These include:
  • Relaxation techniques.
  • Exercise - Physical activity is one of the most effective stress remedies available.
  • Watch your diet - Alcohol, caffeine, sugar, fats, and tobacco all put a strain on your body's ability to cope with stress. A diet with a balance of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and foods high in protein but low in fat will help create optimum health.
  • Get enough rest and sleep.
  • Get away for a while - Read a book, watch a movie, play a game, listen to music, or go out with friends. Leave yourself some time that's just for you.
  • Work off your anger - Get physically active, wash your car, offer to clean out the garage, mow the yard, clean your room!!!
  • Have some fun!! Laugh and be with people you enjoy!

2. Why Driving Makes People Angry

Driving is a dramatic and dynamic activity that involves high-risk incidents and interaction with thousands of unpredictable drivers. Routine events are mixed with incidents that are not routine such as being cut off, tailgated, or having to follow a very slow moving vehicle.

We enjoy the freedom and independence of driving when and where we please. Many drivers do not react well when that expected freedom is interrupted by restrictions, regulations, congestion, and the unexpected actions of other drivers.

The following is a list of emotional challenges that are common reasons why drivers get angry, hostile, and exhibit aggressive behavior:

Restriction. In a traffic jam, when drivers can't get where they are going on time or at the expected speed of travel, anxiety builds up to “escape” the confinement of congested traffic. This anxiety causes drivers to perform aggressive maneuvers to get away or get ahead of others.

Being confronted with danger. Congested traffic filled with impatient drivers making unpredictable moves causes close calls and near collisions. Being confronted with dangerous situations increases stress, fear, resentment, and rage.

Regulation. Government regulation and all of the rules associated with driving angers some people because they feel like it is an imposition, prompting them to disregard the rules because they do not agree with them or they are just rebellious.

Lack of control over the situation. When drivers have no control over their driving environment and are stuck in traffic, the lack of control over the traffic event is frustrating and often leads to anger vented towards a nearby driver. It is the application of the old adage, “frustration leads to aggression.”

Alcohol consumption tends to cause more aggressive behavior. This is another reason to avoid combining alcohol and driving.

Ways to avoid emotional distress when driving include:
  • Signal your intention to turn or change lanes
  • Obey the rules-of-the-road
  • Don’t tailgate - maintain a safe following distance
  • Separate your vehicle from erratic drivers
  • Extend courtesy to other drivers
  • Keep the volume on your speakers low
3. Aggressive Driving

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) defines aggressive driving as “the operation of a motor vehicle in a manner that endangers or is likely to endanger persons or property.”

Examples of aggressive driving behavior include:
  • Improper passing
  • Speeding
  • Improper lane changing
  • Failure to obey traffic controls
  • Reckless, careless, or inattentive driving
  • Making illegal turns
  • Tailgating
  • Failure to signal lane changes
  • Shouting, swearing, name calling
  • Honking to protest another driver's actions
  • Shining high-beam headlights in retaliation
  • Using the vehicle to cut off other drivers
  • Chasing other vehicles in pursuit
  • Physical fighting
  • Gestures
Aggressive driving has several levels and an assortment of penalties - all of which can be avoided if you can learn how to manage your aggressive tendencies when driving.

Law enforcement agencies categorize observable aggressive driving behavior as:
  • Failure to yield the right-of-way
  • Cutting drivers off when passing
  • Not allowing someone to pass safely
  • Incorrectly yielding when entering traffic
  • Making unsafe U-turns
  • Not signaling before slowing for a turn
  • Driving across highway dividers
  • Passing in no-passing zones
  • Passing stopped school buses when warning lights are flashing
  • Speeding in marked construction areas
  • Throwing an object from the vehicle

The list goes on, but it is important to recognize that these behaviors are considered “aggressive” by law enforcement because they demonstrate a disregard for the law.

The aggressive driver typically denies that these collision-causing behaviors are aggressive. But it is clear that drivers that put others in danger by the way they choose to drive are hostile, dangerous, and selfish. They want to force others out of their way. These drivers feel justified in dominating others and that’s what labels this type of behavior “aggressive driving.”

Aggressive drivers kill two to four times more people than impaired drivers.

4. Managing Your Emotions

When you detect your emotions dominating your judgment and actions, practice a technique called self-regulation. Postpone the gratification of getting even or engaging in a hostile act. Short-circuit the buildup of rage.
  • Don't be competitive. Driving is not a contest.

  • Don't take the aggressive actions of other drivers personally. Try not to be judgmental. Don't jump to conclusions about their behavior or actions. Put yourself in the other drivers' shoes. Perhaps they are dealing with an emergency.

  • Listen to soothing music.

  • Cool off when you are angry or frustrated.

  • Go with the flow of traffic. Do not try to beat it or fight it.

  • Give yourself more time then you think you will need to complete your trip. Leave early.

  • Stay focused on the driving task. Using a handheld electronic device while driving takes your hands off the wheel and your eyes off the road, making it a distraction with one of the highest risks. You are not looking at the road ahead and you are not using your hands to control the direction of your vehicle. To compound the risk, using a handheld electronic device requires your thought process to be diverted from the task of driving.

  • Demonstrate the kind of courtesy you would like to receive from others.

  • Adjust the air conditioner to keep yourself cool and calm.
Turn a negative driving situation into a positive scenario. Concentrate on the safety of your vehicle, yourself, and your passengers. If you use courteous behavior, you and society in general will benefit from your decision.

5. Fatigue

It's a busy world. You do so much every day and it is easy to get worn out. Your body demands rest, it can't live without it, and it will shut itself down to get it! If you fall asleep at the wheel, it doesn't just affect you. Your passengers and every other user of the highway system are in peril if you are tired and drive.

Lack of sleep is one of the leading causes of traffic fatalities.

Fatigue can be both mental and physical. Learn to recognize mental and physical fatigue so that you can be sure you never get in a vehicle when your body wants to capture the sleep it needs.

Circadian Rhythm

There is a rhythm built into the human body to seek rest for itself. This rhythm is called the circadian rhythm, and it is on a 24-hour cycle. The body naturally relaxes between 12:00-1:00 a.m. and 4:00-5:00 a.m. - that's why we sleep at night. It is not safe to drive if you have stayed awake during your natural sleep time.

Another time the body naturally seeks rest is in the afternoon, between 1:00-4:00 p.m. Avoid driving during your afternoon "low-time" and during your early morning downtime.

Tired Vision

If you work a late shift or stay up all night doing homework, be aware that fatigue affects your body and your mind. It also affects your senses, especially vision. Fatigue affects your vision because your eye muscles are tired along with the rest of your body and it is difficult to focus.

Microsleep

Microsleeps are sudden, unexpected moments of sleep that last 4-5 seconds. In 4-5 seconds, traveling 50 miles per hour, your vehicle can travel the length of a football field. Microsleep is unpredictable and is only avoided with rest.

Fatigue is Like Consuming Alcohol

Fatigue has many of the same dangerous effects as drinking alcohol.

12 hours awake = same effect as .032 blood alcohol level

18 hours awake = same effect as .07 blood alcohol level

24 hours awake = same effect as .1 blood alcohol level

Ways to deal with fatigue related to driving include:
  • Get a good night sleep prior to a trip.
  • Drive with a passenger.
  • Have regular stops.
  • Avoid alcohol/drugs which cause drowsiness.
  • Stop and take a brief nap (choose a safe place).
Remember, NOTHING compensates for fatigue but rest. Don't drive tired or after drinking and NEVER risk the combination!

Stress, your emotions, and being tired have dangerous effects on your ability to drive safely. Stress and aggression are often displayed by the way people drive.

Many people think alcohol consumption is a good way to relieve stress. Positive ways to deal with stress include:
  • Relaxation
  • Exercise
  • Good diet
  • Being rested
  • Escape with a book, movie, or game
  • Physical activity
  • Have some fun!! Laugh and be with people you enjoy!
Common reasons why drivers get angry, hostile, and exhibit aggressive behavior include:
  • Restriction
  • Being confronted with danger
  • Regulation
  • Lack of control over the situation
Alcohol consumption tends to cause more aggressive behavior. This is another reason to avoid combining alcohol and driving.

Aggressive drivers kill two to four times more people than impaired drivers.

In Florida you can be issued a citation for aggressive driving if you exhibit these behaviors (FS 316.1923):
  • Failure to yield the right-of-way
  • Cutting drivers off when passing
  • Not allowing someone to pass safely
  • Incorrectly yielding when entering traffic
  • Making unsafe U-turns
  • Not signaling before slowing for a turn
  • Driving across highway dividers
  • Passing in no-passing zones
  • Passing stopped school buses when warning lights are flashing
  • Speeding in marked construction areas
  • Throwing an object from the vehicle
The list goes on, but it is important to recognize that these behaviors are considered "aggressive" by law enforcement because they demonstrate a disregard for the law.

When you detect your emotions dominating your judgment and actions, practice a technique called self-regulation. Postpone the gratification of getting even or engaging in a hostile act. Short-circuit the buildup of rage.

Turn a negative driving situation into a positive scenario. Concentrate on the safety of your vehicle, yourself, and your passengers. If you select courteous behavior, you and society in general will benefit from your decision.

Fatigue can be both mental and physical. Learn to recognize mental and physical fatigue so that you can be sure you never get in a vehicle when your body wants to capture the sleep it needs.

Fatigue affects your vision because your eye muscles are tired along with the rest of your body and it is difficult to focus. Microsleep is unpredictable and is only avoided with rest.

Fatigue has many of the same dangerous effects as drinking alcohol.

12 hours awake = same effect as .032 blood alcohol level
18 hours awake = same effect as .07 blood alcohol level
24 hours awake = same effect as .1 blood alcohol level

Ways to deal with fatigue related to driving include:
  • Get a good night sleep prior to a trip
  • Drive with a passenger
  • Have regular stops
  • Avoid alcohol/drugs which cause drowsiness
  • Stop and take a brief nap (choose a safe place)
So far in the course, we have covered the physiological (mechanical, physical, and biochemical) effects of alcohol and other drugs on the body.

Our next topic is the psychological (mental processes and behavior) factors related to alcohol and other drugs. A fully functional mind is necessary to process information from the eyes and other senses. When driving, the mind must quickly determine how to react to information and then send immediate instructions to your arms, hands, legs, and feet to steer and/or control the speed of your vehicle.

We have defined drug use, abuse, dependency, and addiction and will further elaborate on the psychological reasons why people choose to place themselves in these categories.

Blood Alcohol Level and Impaired driving

Alcohol affects your driving ability

The Cost of Alcohol and Drug Impairment

Psychological factors related to alcohol and other drugs

Effects of Different Types of Drugs

Stress, emotions, and fatigue

Factors related to alcohol absorption and Long-Term Effects of Alcohol and Other Drugs


Florida TLSAE/Drug & Alcohol 4 hour Course Online

Who is required to take this 4-hour drug and alcohol course?

This is a first-time drivers ed course for new aspiring drivers. The state of Florida requires all new drivers take a 4-hour drug and alcohol course. If you want your Permit License you must take this course. You can take the DATA course when you are 14 1/2. You can sign up right now at our website. Our course is easy and fun!
  •     Florida 4 hour first-time drivers course also referred as:
  •     TLSAE - Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education
  •     DATA - Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness course
  •     DATE Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness Education course
  •     ADAPT - Alcohol Drugs Accident Prevention Training
  •     Drug & Alcohol Course or Drug and Alcohol Class
  •     Florida Permit Test or Florida Permit Exam Course
  •     The Permit Test is also known as the DMV Exam or DMV Test
Florida first time driver course required to get a Florida drivers license. Florida first time driver courses teach drivers how drugs and alcohol affect driving,. In that situation you have to go home, make a new appointment and return the DMV. Every new driver is required to take a Florida TLSAE course.

Enroll your Florida 4 hour drug and alcohol course online and meet your learner's permit requirement.

Take Your FL Drug & Alcohol Test. FL DMV Authorized. Get Started Now!